Wednesday, 25 February 2009

Recycling large and small - and this and that



It hardly seems possible that a week has gone by since I was last here (though I have been assiduously following blogs each evening for relaxation after some very tiring days). Thankyou meanwhile for many kind comments; I had hoped to respond 'in person' and don't know where the time goes. What with writing a 2,200 word article that had been delayed due to the computer crash - still not fixed; attempting to clean the house, or parts of it; massive food replenishment shopping (Saturday) and another exhibition on Sunday - this time 'Focus on Imaging' (photography), there has not been a spare moment. Plus more writing Monday and Tuesday - finished article, and then back to the FoI yesterday (Wednesday), for neither Raymond or I had concluded our camera investigations.

The outcome as far as I was concerned was that I did NOT need the new camera I had promised myself. I decided that no amount of new gear would improve my photography; it's the person behind the camera that needs upgrading! Instead I invested in a sturdy tripod. Saved myself no end of money. In between, we've been assessing all the garden maintenance that needs doing, and talking about the next major house refurbishment, all of which entails jobs-within-jobs: to do job a: we first need to do job b: and that for us ALWAYS means throwing out items collected over the years that are no longer needed. (Who, for instance, wants or needs a printer's image-setter sitting in their kitchen? It's been there since 1999, because it did not reach its reserve when we retired ten years ago and auctioned our publishing and printing business, and R. is STILL convinced it has 'value'.) I guess I could recycle the copper wire inside, as I did with a burned out coil from another old piece of machinery. That shiny, malleable wire sits in a bucket in the laundry room awaiting use for binding hand-made books.

I love to recycle unwanted items (but not the d----d image-setter, the size of a very large and useless cupboard that cannot be opened!) My latest find has been ten tiny mother-of pearl buttons, all shimmery like the inside of the sea-shell from which they were cut or punched. Incongruously, they were stitched to a plain white stretch-cotton cardigan obtained at a charity/thrift shop. I buy these a sack-load at a time for Raymond (not for him to wear but for the fabric); I cut the garments apart so that he can use the pieces when he is polishing the beautiful furniture he makes in his 'spare' time. I always remove the buttons which are usually quite ordinary, but these are special and minute, and will be perfect on some small fabric book.

Serendipity really, as you can read in my other blog on journaling  - when I have written it as I seem to have gone down today with some sort of lurgi and feel terrible. Dear R. has offered to cook a fish-pie supper (I was going to make him pizza, putting the dough to rise on a wooden board he made me, by the wood-burning stove). Maybe with his offer I cam snuggle by same fire and write other blog-post.

Meanwhile - the 'large and small' of this posting's title: the wood-mountain which we negotiate - nails and all - to source our firewood, and the strip of tiny buttons that has been added to my stash.

7 comments:

  1. Hope you get to feeling better soon.. Prop your feet up beside the stove and rest a bit.. and tell your dear husband to fix you up a nice hot cupa tea.

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  2. Hi Ann - hope you are soon feeling better. I really enjoyed your piece about seasonal celebrations in OG&H. I love the rhythm of the year. I also love old buttons - what a nice find.

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  3. Well, again I say, busy, busy, busy! I have a tripod, but find it too much work to set up. I'm a point and flash kind of person. Life is too spontaneous for me to use a tripod. Of course, sometimes I have to lean agains something sturdy to keep the camera steady, but hey, I'm no spring chicken any more!

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  4. life here sounds very good! all the little ups, downs, ins & outs that make us all go round!

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  5. There's nothing like moving to get rid of stuff Ann. We have tons of stuff we don't need - me being a person to squirrel stuff away because you never know when it will be useful. Get ready to move and you wonder what is wrong that you have kept all this stuff for reasons now not apparent! Oh my. Bill

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  6. This is indeed a rich life! Lovely wood and marvellous little buttons - hope it's not the dreaded virus I keep hearing about! keep warm

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  7. Hello Ann - I hope you're better soon. My husband and I are BOTH hoarders, so no hope for us! - especially since we plan to downsize next year . . . We could do with some of that wonderful woodpile you photographed : )

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