Friday, 16 January 2009

Bird behaviour




I have had my head in the computer for days now, from first light, hardly time to journal or notice the 'lovely things' I spoke of in my last posting. "Look," my husband said, as we sat in bed drinking early morning tea just after dawn. "Look at the rooks." The usual flock was flying south from wherever they roost overnight (I haven't discovered exactly where yet). Flying in contingents but not in their usual straight line - they came in waves, swirling, circling, loitering almost. Why?

What was different about today? Wind direction? Murky cloud cover? Drizzle? Surely not. I must re-read Mark Cocker's 'Crow Country' - a marvellous and dedicated observation of these gregarious creatures. Morning and evening (when they return to their roosting site) we watch them; such enigmatic birds. As Shakespeare wrote so poetically, "Night thickens, and the crow makes wing to the rooky woods." I should have tried to sketch a rook; in fact there have been so many different species of birds at the bird feeders today I could have filled a page of sketches.

My day has been more than usually hectic but I have a joy to look forward to: Rosie (of ruminations, rambles, reflexions) is "interviewing" me. I am presently reflecting upon my responses and will post her questions and my answers very shortly. Thankyou Rosie.

7 comments:

  1. Wonderful musing about crows. I must forward this to my friend, Mama Crow who will delight in your observations and book recommendations. Of course all of us in the US have been greatly moved by the "miracle on the Hudson" - the brilliant landing of an airplane into the Hudson river after an apparant bird strike to both engines. What happens when men and birds collide...........
    Can't wait to read your interview. So exciting! k

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  2. The book is published by Vintage (ISBN 978-0-099-48508-7). The writing is breathtaking and has had me watching rooks ever since I first read it. (Bought it in a lovely bookshop cum cafe that is a magnet when I am in town.) There were even more birds swirling this morning, and another flock flew over at mid-day. I plan to walk down 'Happy Valley' to where I think the rookery is and take pics, when time allows. I have been thinking of you since hearing of the aeroplane incident, as I believe the plane was heading towards Charlotte (?your airport). I must ask our airline pilot son about bird strikes. We were once hit by a swallow at around 8,000ft in our Cherokee Six.

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  3. thanks for your nice comments on my blog ann can't wait to see the poem. i bought this book recently but haven't got around to it yet.

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  4. I can almost see and hear the rooks! Lovely Ann - looking forward to the answers too and hearing more about you!

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  5. Angie, so good to 'meet' you again. You will love 'Crow Country', the poetry of landscape, the observations. (I'll email you the poem when I find where I have put it!) I wrote it during the Bloxham workshop an stamped it onto tissue paper ready to stitch, but the ink and paper were not compatible and bled. It looks a mess! Ann.

    Rosie, thankyou for becoming a 'follower'. I am about to complete the interview questions - think I'll add the extra answer about music as it is relevant. Ann.

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  6. Hi Ann - I love the picture of you in bed sipping your morning tea and watching the crows flying by - will look forward to your interview - how fun.

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  7. It's a morning ritual - drinking tea whilst I journal and Raymond does crosswords, and of late (since the Autumn) daily rook-watching in that space of sky visible through the bedroom window, without getting out of bed! (Interview conducted by Rosie (rambling rose) is almost complete, should be posted later today.) Ann.

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